Unsafe on Any Campus?

Six Questions for College and University and Admissions Staff


High school officials and parents don’t bear sole responsibility for changing the campus climate. Parents and college students can also become powerful and effective advocates for change and accountability. Among the questions they should ask college and university administrators are:

  1. What programs are in place to assist victims, reduce the risks of sexual assault, prevent sexual assault, and hold offenders accountability? What performance measures do you use to evaluate their effectiveness?
  2. How education programming do you provide to freshman on sexual assault and bystander intervention? What is the participation rate?
  3. Is dorm staff trained in sexual assault awareness, bystander intervention and victim support?
  4. What fraternities, sororities or students groups are active in providing sexual assault prevention, risk reduction, and other training to students on campus?
  5. How does your college or university benchmark its performance among its peers?
  6. How often does your college or university review its sexual assault, victim advocate, and adjudication policies?

What Parents, Students, and High-School Councilors Can Do To Prevent Sexual Assault and Reduce Risks of Sexual Assault for College Students 


Many people have asked me what I would recommend parents or their college-age stduents do when they hear about my interest and research on college sexual assault. Here are 10 proactive steps that can lessen the risk of becoming a victim and improve the overall climate on campuses. Among these actions are:

  1. Enroll in a martial-arts based self-defense program as early as middle school or ninth grade that includes scenario-based training and situational awareness.
  2. Encourage high schools to include human sexuality in their curricula so that students are at least exposed to professional opinion about sex, intimacy, and human bonding, and why sexual assault and rape can be so devastating.
  3. Encourage high school college counselors to include workshops on the risks and dangers on modern campus life, including bystander roles, responsibilities, and interventions.
  4. Encourage parent groups and associations to hold workshops on campus sexual assault, risk reduction, and prevention.
  5. Encourage adult discussions with teenagers and college-age children about sexual assault and how it impacts their lives and the lives of their friends.
  6. Be open to a wide range of remedies and strategies for addressing sexual assault on college campuses while also insisting on evidence-based accountability in the programs;
  7. Insist that colleges and universities hold offenders accountable, and provide evidence that their programs are reducing risks of sexual assault faced by students.
  8. Read the campus sexual assault policies for the colleges and universities students plan to attend.
  9. Ask for data on sexual assaults, investigations, and the results of those investigations.
  10. Ensure college-bound students are aware of programs and support available to them and their friends at the schools they plan to attend.Type your paragraph here.
Campus Ninja
Self-Defense